‘The Talk’ Co-Host Drops Her Pants for Underwareness

August 26, 2014 2 min read

Did you catch the Emmys last night? If so, you might have noticed Depend’s newest commercial for its “Underwareness” campaign.

The commercial features ‘The Talk’ co-host Sheryl Underwood who gives a testimony on how Depend underwear has given back her confidence after experiencing bladder leakage.

“I am one of the hosts of a top-rated talk show and I wear Depend because I had bladder leakage after having a hysterectomy and I’m going to have to live like this for the rest of my life,” Underwood says in the commercial. “When you’re in the entertainment business, there’s a lot of pressure in being glamorous…but nobody ever says, “What are you going to do if you got bladder leakage?’”

Affecting over 25 million people in the United States, urinary incontinence is a bladder condition that is often seen as a hush-hush topic, causing sufferers to feel embarrassed and reluctant to seek help. Depend’s Underwareness campaign aims to encourage these people and their supporters to take a stand and recognize that there are some people who just wear a different type of underwear.

“There’s no name on this. There’s no face on this. Anyone can suffer from bladder leakage, but if there’s somebody like me that comes out and says, ‘Hey, I’m going through this. You don’t have to do this alone. That’s what ‘underawareness’ is all about,” Underwood continues.

The talk show host goes on to show that the disposable underwear allows her to stay active and exercise. Viewers can see her box, run the elliptical and do rope exercises, indicating that people with incontinence can still do the activities they love and be confident despite their bladder control problems.

Depend also has another commercial featuring stand-up poet “Mighty” Mike McGee, who was born with spina bifida and experiences bladder leakage. Depend hopes to donate $3 million over the next three years to United Way Worldwide and the Simon Foundation for Continence. So far, the Underwareness campaign has raised a little over $31,500.

Source: The Wrap


Subscribe