How to Choose Disposable Incontinence Underwear

September 09, 2014 2 min read

Disposable incontinence underwear (also called adult pull ups or protective underwear) offer a great way for people with bladder problems to manage their leaks while also leading an active life. There are many different styles of adult pull ups to choose from and it’s important that you choose the right type to prevent embarrassing accidents. When choosing disposable incontinence underwear, ask yourself the following questions:

  • Are you physically capable of changing yourself?

    Adult pull ups are pulled up and down (hence its name) like regular underwear. If you have back problems, arthritis or physical ailments that may make it hard for you to pull the briefs up and down, these may not be a good fit for you. Adult diapers with tape tabs may be a better option.

  • Are you male or female?

    Protective underwear are available in unisex and gender-specific styles. The unisex underwear work great for many people but others may find more comfort in a style that is designed to mold to the body. Tena, Depend and Prevail all make incontinence underwear that feature stretchy waistbands and contoured fit for men and women.

  • What size are you?

    As with any type of incontinence product you use, the size should be the correct size – your size. Take note of the waist/hip measurements of the brief and make sure that it’ll accommodate your body. Wearing the correct sized brief is critical to preventing leaks and rashes.

  • How much and how often do you leak?

    Make sure the brief you choose is the right absorbency for your incontinence problems. Do you lose a few drops while exercising? If so, you probably don’t even need a pull up; an incontinence pad would suffice.

Incontinence absorbent underwear are not all made equally. This means that you’ll need to try out a few different styles and brands to find the brief that best fits your needs. National Incontinence offers a wide range of protective underwear for both men and women with moderate to heavy incontinence.

Subscribe