Drop Your Pants for Incontinence Awareness

July 29, 2014 2 min read

Depend wants you to drop your pants.

Yes, you read that right. The “Drop Your Pants for Underwareness” campaign is Kimberly-Clark’s latest push to reduce stigma associated with incontinence and wearing adult briefs and underwear.

Although urinary incontinence affects one in four Americans, the issue is still a hush-hush topic, making those who suffer from the condition feel embarrassed and reluctant to get help. Fortunately, the incontinence products of today are more flattering and discreet than bulky and crinkly briefs of the past. They’re designed to look and feel like regular underwear, so users can feel confident wearing them out in public. Depend’s newest commercial shows just this.

The scene opens with an above-the-waist shot of a man walking through a busy city. More pedestrians follow him, as bystanders turn their heads to look. The shot widens to reveal the whole group is pantsless and wearing only Depend underwear.

“It’s time to bring it out in the open – it’s time to drop your pants for Underwareness,” a voiceover says. “A cause to support the over 65 million people who may need Depend underwear. Show them they’re not alone, and show off a pair of Depend, because wearing a different kind of underwear is no big deal.”

The commercial ends with text promoting underwareness.com, Depend’s new site to educate others on bladder leakage and take part in the campaign.

The website is covered with photos of people wearing regular clothing on top and Depends underwear on bottom. Visitors can also find a rap music video featuring Depend employees sporting their own product.

Those who don’t suffer from incontinence are encouraged to post a photo of themselves wearing a pair of Depends on social media to support others who do need protection. For every photo, video or message tagged with #Underwareness or #DropYourPants, Depend will donate $1, up to a total of $3 million, to the Simon Foundation for Continence and the United Way Worldwide.

So far, the campaign has raised over $700, but it’s just getting started. Will you drop your pants for Underwareness?


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